Deploying Windows Server 2012 Primary Computer Setting

For companies (or homes) using roaming profiles and folder redirection, Microsoft gave you are great new feature in Windows Server 2012 called Primary Computer. This feature hasn’t been talked about that much although it really should have been. The Primary Computer feature allows you to define the primary computer for a user in Active Directory on a user object. Once applied to a user account it prevents the distribution of their roaming profile on non-primary devices and for folder redirection, disables the ability to sync the folders with Offline Files for non-primary devices.

So What is the Benefit

This is ideal for several reasons. Firstly, it helps to reduce profile corruption for roaming profile users when roaming between machines which may be running different versions of Windows or different architectures. Also for roaming profile users, it greatly improves logon and logoff times for non-primary devices. If a user is logging on to a kiosk computer for example, they don’t need their roaming profile and they probably just want to access a service or application quickly so why wait for it? For users of folder redirection, this means that the user is able to access their files when the computer is on the network and can access the file share resource which hosts those redirected folders, but they are non cached using Offline Files. For the business, this is a great security benefit as it means that somebody logging on to a temporary machine isn’t going to be caching all of those files, files which they could potentially leave on the train or in an aeroplane overhead locker. For laptops which typically have small hard disk capacities this is useful for both roaming profile and folder redirection scenarios as it means that you aren’t pulling down potentially gigabytes of data to the local machine clogging up the disk.

Implementing Primary Devices Using Active Directory Administration Center

First, launch the Active Directory Administrative Center and navigate your OU structure to find the computer object for the computer that you want to make primary for a given user, or if you already know the machine name, use the search feature to locate it.

Primary Computer Finding Distinguished Name

From the computer account object, scroll down to the bottom of the view and select the Attribute Editor tab. Scroll through the list of attributes to find the distinguishedName attribute and select the View button to show the full DN.

Primary Computer Copy Distinguished Name

On the String Attribute Editor, right click the pre-highlighted text and select the Copy option from the context menu. Cancel out of the Attribute Editor and cancel out of the computer object view.

With the DN of the computer now in the clipboard, find the user that you want to make this the primary computer for either by searching or again, navigating your OU structure.

Primary Computer Set User msDS-PrimaryComputer

On the user account, do as we did with the computer account a moment ago, scroll down and select the Attribute Editor tab. Scroll through the list of attributes until you locate the msDS-PrimaryComputer attribute then click the Edit button. Right-click in Value to Add box and select Paste from the context menu to paste in the DN of the computer then select the Add button.

Click OK to close the Multi-Valued String Editor dialog then click OK to exit out of the user account properties. Your work here is done.

Implementing Primary Devices Using PowerShell

Out of the box, there is actually no neat way of implementing Primary Devices using PowerShell. To do it, we have to plug a few Cmdlets together. Firstly, get the attributes for the computer and store them in an object. $Computer = Get-ADComputer Computer1 (where Computer1 is the name of the computer). Next, we map the computer that we just stored in the $Computer object to the user. Set-ADUser User1 -Add @{‘msDS-PrimaryComputer’ = “$Computer”} (where User1 is the name of the user). With those two Cmdlets out of the way, the partnership between the user and the computer should now be done, but we can verify this with the following Cmdlet. Get-ADUser User1 -Properties msDS-PrimaryComputer

Configuring Folder Redirection and Roaming Profiles

Now that we’ve setup Primary Computer attributes for some users, it would probably be a good idea if our Group Policy settings for Roaming Profile and Folder Redirection actually honoured these settings and only transferred out the data to the users’ primary computers. The setting for Folder Redirection is available as both a User Setting and a Computer Setting in Group Policy whereas the Roaming Profile setting is only available as a Computer Setting. Because of the fact you can’t apply both of these policy settings from a single policy if you decide to use user targeting, my advice is to apply this as a computer policy. It makes good sense to keep these two settings together as it means you can see that you are applying the Primary Computer setting to both roaming profiles and folder redirection in one view and it means you can give your Group Policy Object a meaningful name like Primary Computer Roaming Settings or the like.

From the Group Policy Management Console, navigate to the Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System. From the System node, you will find the Folder Redirection and User Profiles nodes.

Inside the Folder Redirection node, enable the Redirect folders on primary computers only policy setting. Inside the User Profiles node, enable the Download roaming profiles on primary computers only setting.

richardjgreen

Richard works as a Cloud Consultant for Fordway Solution where his primary focus is to help customers understand, adopt and develop with Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and System Center. Richard Green is an IT Pro with over 15 years' of experience in all things Microsoft including System Center and Office 365. He has previously worked as a System Center consultant and as an internal solutions architect across many verticals. Outside of work, he loves motorbikes and is part of the orange army, marshaling for NGRRC, British Superbikes and MotoGP. He is also an Assistant Cub Scout Leader.